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Is Our Election System Broken? Can We Fix It?
March 09, 2007
On Friday, March 9, 2007, the AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project hosted a conference entitled "Is Our Election System Broken? Can We Fix It?" The event took place at the American Enterprise Institute, 1150 Seventeenth Street, NW, Washington, DC, from 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM.

Panelists at this AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project conference reviewed the election reform lessons to be learned from the 2006 midterm elections. They discussed the problems that occurred as well as the federal and state reforms to be considered in the near future.

To read a transcript from this event, go here, or scroll to the bottom of this page for a PDF version.

To listen to audio or view video from this event, go here.

Agenda

8:30 a.m. Registration

9:00 a.m. Panel I: The Lessons from November

Panelists: Rick Hasen, Loyola Law School
Gracia Hillman, Election Assistance Commission
Todd Rokita, Indiana Secretary of State

Moderator: John Fortier, AEI

10:30 a.m. Keynote Address: Rep. Vernon Ehlers (R-MI)

11:00 a.m. Panel II: What’s Brewing for Election Reform?

Panelists: Zachary Goldfarb, The Washington Post
Doug Chapin, electionline.org
Thomas Mann, The Brookings Institution

Moderator: Norman J. Ornstein, AEI

12:30 p.m. Adjournment
Featured Resources
In this piece, the Election Reform Project's Jessica Leval reviews Heather Gerken's book, The Democracy Index, which details a proposal for creating a ranking system for state and local governments based on the performance of their elections.
This issue brief summarizes the case in favor of modernization of voter registration procedures. It notes that more than two million voters were unable to vote in the 2008 election as a direct result of issues with registration.
Based upon election data collected since the passage of HAVA, this Project Vote memo recommends adopting a number of policies in order to increase the number of provisional ballots counted in future elections.
We reflect on the state of election administration in the United States almost a decade after the 2000 presidential election and suggest how additional changes in technology, election law and administrative practices might further strengthen American elections in the years ahead.
This report provides the results from an evaluation of five projects to improve election data collection in 2008. Overall, the grantees increased their level of core data collection, improving to 80 percent of the core data from less than half in 2006.
Research Projects
As part of its broader research focus on elections, campaign ethics, campaign finance, and the legislative process, the Center for American Politics and Citizenship at the University of Maryland is engaged in research projects on voting technology and ballot design specifically.
The mission of the VoTeR center is to advise state agencies in the use of voting technologies and to investigate voting solutions and voting equipment to develop and recommend safe use procedures for their usage in elections.
Election Law @ Moritz, run through Moritz College of Law at the Ohio State University, contains both explanation and commentary on a wealth of election reform issues from a legal perspective.
Center for Democracy & Election Management was established at the School of Public Affairs at American University in 2002. Their broader goal is to pave the way for and strengthen democracy through improved electoral performance.
The Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law is a non-partisan public policy and law institute that focuses on fundamental issues of democracy and justice.
The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research
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The Brookings Institution
www.brookings.edu
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