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Is Our Election System Broken? Can We Fix It?
March 09, 2007
On Friday, March 9, 2007, the AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project hosted a conference entitled "Is Our Election System Broken? Can We Fix It?" The event took place at the American Enterprise Institute, 1150 Seventeenth Street, NW, Washington, DC, from 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM.

Panelists at this AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project conference reviewed the election reform lessons to be learned from the 2006 midterm elections. They discussed the problems that occurred as well as the federal and state reforms to be considered in the near future.

To read a transcript from this event, go here, or scroll to the bottom of this page for a PDF version.

To listen to audio or view video from this event, go here.

Agenda

8:30 a.m. Registration

9:00 a.m. Panel I: The Lessons from November

Panelists: Rick Hasen, Loyola Law School
Gracia Hillman, Election Assistance Commission
Todd Rokita, Indiana Secretary of State

Moderator: John Fortier, AEI

10:30 a.m. Keynote Address: Rep. Vernon Ehlers (R-MI)

11:00 a.m. Panel II: What’s Brewing for Election Reform?

Panelists: Zachary Goldfarb, The Washington Post
Doug Chapin, electionline.org
Thomas Mann, The Brookings Institution

Moderator: Norman J. Ornstein, AEI

12:30 p.m. Adjournment
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